The Bluffer's Guide to Bond

Packed with Bond trivia

Your one-stop crib to the world’s greatest secret agent

The Bluffer's Guide to Bond

Packed with Bond trivia

Buy The Bluffer's Guide to Bond at Amazon

This was published in the year Daniel Craig took over 007 duties, and it was a real pleasure to be able to pick up on the ‘darkness' that the producers reintroduced into the character. For years I'd been saying that Ian Fleming's morally complex novels were hugely better than the lightweight, gadget-ridden corn-fests that the films had become. Thankfully Craig's ‘Casino Royale' was more along these lines.

The book is peppered with Bond trivia: his aftershave was Floris No 89 (the number coming from the Floris shop's address on London's Jermyn Street) ... an early title for Moonraker was Mondays Are Hell ... In the film of Dr No, Ursula Andress (she of the white bikini) had her voice dubbed by another actress. This book might not leave you shaken but it could leave you ... No, I'm sorry. Don't know what came over me.

Others...

What Men Think About Sex

What Men Think About Sex

The race is on...

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The Catch

The Catch

One man, one woman, one problem ...

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The C Words

The C Words

Commitment, coupledom, children...

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The Bluffer's Guide to Football

The Bluffer's Guide to Football

Packed with football trivia

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The Importance of Being Trivial

The Importance of Being Trivial

The book that gave this site its name

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Walk The Lines

Walk The Lines

The London Underground Overground

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Move Along Please

Move Along Please

Land's End to John O'Groats by local bus

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Mail Obsession

Mail Obsession

A Journey Round Britain By Postcode

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Question Time

Question Time

A Journey Round Britain's Quizzes

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Content

Rubik's Cube

A Rubik’s cube has more combinations than light travels inches in a century. This is my favourite illustration of how a very small number of factors can produce an absurdly complicated situation. A silly little toy, with only three squares in each of its three dimensions. How can that get complicated? Well, as anyone who's ever tried to solve one just by guessing will tell you, it gets very complicated. The number of possible combinations is 43,252,003,274,489,856,000. Forget billions - that's 43 quintillion and change. (In fact the cube's manufacturers just said ‘billions' in their advertising, figuring that no one would know what a quintillion was. It's a billion billion.) The number of inches light travels in a century, meanwhile, is a mere 37,165,049,856,000,000,000. Or thereabouts.